The Music of the Moravian Church in America

Catalog, edited by Nola Reed Knouse, 2010

//1. The Music of the Moravian Church in America
  • The Music of the Moravian Church in America

1. The Music of the Moravian Church in America

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5 out of 5 based on 2 customer ratings
(2 customer reviews)

Copyright 2008, edited by Nola Reed Knouse

This book places Moravian music in cultural and religious context and demonstrates the varied roles that music played in one of America’s most distinctive ethno-cultural populations. The chapters examine sacred and secular works, both vocal and instrumental.

Preface by the Rev. Nola Reed Knouse, Ph.D., Director of the Moravian Music Foundation

SKU: MUSICMORAM Category:

Product Description

Copyright 2008, edited by Nola Reed Knouse
University of Rochester Press    www.urpress.com

Preface by Nola Reed Knouse
excerpt: “The musical heritage of the Moravians is 550 years old now, and continues to grow from deep roots. To all who have taught and learned, composed and edited, sung and played, and worshiped with this music, past and present, and to those who will do so in our future, this work is humbly dedicated.”

Chapters:

  1. The Moravians and Their Music – N. R. Knouse
  2. Moravian Worship – C. Daniel Crews
  3. Hymnody of the Moravian Church – Albert Frank and N. R. Knouse
  4. Moravian Sacred Choral Music – Alice M. Caldwell
  5. The Organ in Moravian Church Music – Lou Carol Fix
  6. The  Role and Development of Brass Music in the Moravian Church – Paul Peucker
  7. The Collegia Musica: Music of the Community – N. R. Knouse
  8. Music in the Moravian Boarding Schools – Pauline M. Fox
  9. The Piano among the Moravians – Jewel A. Smith
  10. Moravian Music: Questions of Identity and Purpose – N. R. Knouse

Appendix 1 Biographical Sketches

Appendix 2 A Moravian Musical Timeline

 

2 reviews for 1. The Music of the Moravian Church in America

  1. 5 out of 5

    :

    This marvelous collection of essays presents a rich, provocative account of an underappreciated musical heritage. Its penetrating insights go well beyond Moravian culture. Indeed, this book should be required reading for any person, of any denomination, interested in the complex issue of music in liturgy. Lorenzo Candelaria, Univ of Texas at Austin (Musicology)

  2. 5 out of 5

    :

    A giant step in the ongoing task of disseminating information about the origins of Moravian music and its importance on the American musical scene. The assembly of works by significant scholars is well illustrated by examples of printed music, hymns, and both original and translated texts. – J. Edwin Hendricks, Wake Forest University (History)

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